Projects

© WWF-US / Nikhil Advani
  • CLIMATE ADAPTATION PROJECTS DATABASE

    The climate adaptation projects database showcases climate adaptation initiatives around the world, drawn from a collection of other sources. It exhibits case studies of adaptation projects, which include climate hazards and impacts, and the corresponding adaptation strategies.

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  • WILDLIFE ADAPTATION INNOVATION FUND

    WWF’s “Wildlife Adaptation Innovation Fund” supports the testing of new ideas through on the ground projects which have potential to reduce the vulnerability of species to changes in climate. Success and lessons learned from these pilot projects will provide useful guidance that move conservation beyond business as usual approaches and rapidly scale promising efforts to help wildlife endure under conditions of rapid change.

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Piloting an ancient Bolivian agricultural technique to reduce the impacts of drought and frosts

Local farmers from the indigenous community of Santa Maria Yucuhiti have reported that during the last 5 years, drought, floods and frost events have increased significantly causing damage to main crops such as coffee, fruits and “milpa” (a combination of maize, beans and zucchini). Such damage is adversely affecting people's livelihoods and causing harm to natural vegetation, as farmers are beginning to deforest protected natural areas to make up for agricultural losses. To address these impacts, WWF-Mexico is piloting an ancient Bolivian agricultural technique called “camellones” (ridges) or “Suka Kollus” (native name), which is a system of artificial water channels surrounding crops that create micro-climates. Benefits of this technique include: moderate night temperatures, reduced drought effects, irrigated soils, reduced soil erosion and pest control. The project will test the system’s effectiveness on Mesoamerican crops (mainly coffee, fruits and “milpa”), in particular, the extent to which it reduces impacts of drought and frost. In doing so, the project aims to reduce the vulnerability of the farming community to extreme weather events, and thereby reduce pressure on natural ecosystems.

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Relocating Pacific walrus carcasses to minimize disturbance by predators

As arctic sea ice continues to decline under a changing climate, Pacific walruses are losing suitable haulout sites (places where walruses can come ashore and rest). As a result, walruses are concentrating in fewer places in increasingly large numbers. In the Chukotka region of Russia, herds of up to 100 thousand have been observed. Such abnormal over-crowding can pose a serious threat to populations of walrus, as any sort of disturbance from humans or predators can cause panic and mass-stampedes, resulting in a high number of casualties. To reduce the frequency of such events, we are implementing a project that seeks to minimize disturbances by removing walrus carcasses and transporting them away from haulout locations. Predators such as polar bears will no longer be attracted to the herds, thereby reducing the frequency of stampede events.

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Constructing artificial nests for shy albatross

The shy albatross is a threatened and endemic Tasmanian species, facing a variety of anthropogenic threats across their range. The life-history of shy albatross makes them particularly sensitive to the unprecedented anthropogenic climate-changes occurring in both their marine foraging habitats and the terrestrial breeding environments. Recent work has obtained empirical evidence for some of the climate impacts upon this species. For example, increased air temperatures during the chick-rearing period are associated with reduced annual breeding success (proportion of eggs laid that successfully produce chicks at the end of the breeding season) and temperatures will continue to increase in the future under all plausible emissions scenarios. 

The current focus of the shy albatross conservation program is on investigating whether the provision of high-quality artificial nests can improve breeding success and provide a boost to the population by increasing the number of chicks produced in a given breeding season. Based on promising results from an initial proof-of-concept prototype, WWF-Australia has scaled the project with support from the WWF-US Wildlife Adaptation and Innovation Fund. To date, the team has constructed and installed a total of 120 mudbrick and concrete nests on the remote Albatross island.  Preliminary observations have shown the albatross readily adopting and augmenting their new nests. Ongoing monitoring will determine what kind of impact this has on breeding success. 

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Preserving high elevation habitat for red panda populations

We are working with communities in the Khangchendzonga Landscape (India) to minimise habitat encroachment for firewood collection, develop a plan for forest fire management, and regulate extraction of wild plants. As red panda populations shift to higher elevations under a changing climate, this will ensure they have adequate habitat in which to thrive.

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PROJECT | The School for Field Studies

Implementing conservation agriculture in Tanzania to reduce vulnerability of small-scale farmers to climate change

In the highlands of Karatu District, farmers have experienced declining yields due to frequent drought and soil degradation, which is exacerbated by increasingly erratic rainfall. To improve farm productivity in the face of climate change, WWF-US funded a small-scale adaptation project implemented by the School for Field Studies and in collaboration with the local community of Kilimatembo. By constructing trenches, ridges and terraces to prevent runoff, and planting trees and grasses to help stabilize the soil, the project aims to improve conservation of soil and water in small farms and thereby improve yields.

 

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Overcoming deteriorating water resources in Hoima, Uganda

The rural village of Kihigwa, located in Hoima District Uganda, once relied on a consistent pattern of rainfall that would come and go in moderation in accordance to the biannual rainy season. The ever-increasing impacts of climate change though have transformed this once stable system into a system of extremes. Consequently, the people of Kihigwa are being forced to adjust to longer and hotter dry seasons and shorter rainy seasons with heavier storms. While this change is having severe impacts on many aspects of life, the people of Kihigwa felt that their water resources were being degraded the most. They came to this conclusion after participating in several weeks of intensive discussions and activities that allowed them to analyze their situation and develop realistic solutions that would benefit the greatest number of people. In Kihigwa, people had always depended on open springs sources to collect their water. In the changing climate though, those sources had become more prone to drying up during droughts and more susceptible to contamination from surface runoff during heavy storms. This led to increases in water borne illnesses and an increase in the time needed to fetch water during drought. In response to this challenge, the community of Kihigwa worked with a local Peace Corps Volunteer to identify the most important water sources in the village. Using funds acquired from a WWF grant, four key open water springs in Kihigwa were transformed into protected shallow wells and springs. These actions have ensured that the water sources are protected from contamination at all times while also providing a stable flow of water all year round even during drought.

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PROJECT | World Wildlife Fund

Ichupa Upcycle Project

With two rainy seasons growing noticeably shorter, Uganda continues to endure the struggles of climate change with longer droughts in between its seasons and with few interventions rectifying the problem. The idea behind the Ichupa Upcycle project is to to divert water off of roofs using plastic bottles leading into a water storage tank made from the same building materials with the addition of several support materials and cement. 


The Ichupa Upcycle Project includes a four-phase program that begins with having the local government officials, the Mbale Cleanup Committee, and a community of volunteers leading a district-wide cleanup. The next phase, with the plastic materials collected, bagged and stored, we will be organizing a small team of passionate volunteers from each of the four (4) identified sites to assume the role of leading the build outs for the water bottle gutter systems, and then later the rainwater harvesting tanks. Upon the completion of the build outs, five (5) community members will be identified to undergo a basic training/mentorship in business planning, financial literacy and bookkeeping practices in order to continue on with the Ichupa Upcycle Project in creating the Ichupa Upcycle Enterprise.

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